Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Dot gov

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you’re on a federal government site.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Immigrants & Dual Nationals

Immigrants

U.S. immigrants are required by law to register with the Selective Service System.

NOTE: Registering with Selective Service is not signing up for the Armed Services. The Selective Service System is not part of the Department of Defense.

Immigrant Men Are Required to Register

With very few exceptions, all immigrant males between ages 18 and 25 are required by law to register with the Selective Service System (SSS) within 30 days of arriving in the United States. This includes naturalized citizens, parolees, undocumented immigrants, legal permanent residents, asylum seekers, refugees, and all males with visas more than 30 days expired.

Non-Immigrant Foreigners

Non-immigrant men living in the United States on a valid visa are not required to register for as long as they remain on a valid visa up until they turn 26. If you have received a letter from us requesting that you register, please send us copies of supporting documentation to show you are exempt.

Men 26+

Once a man turns 26, he is no longer able to register with the Selective Service System. If you entered the U.S. prior to turning 26, but are now 26 or older, and have not registered, learn more here.

Men 31+

Immigrant men who are 31 or older who are seeking naturalization and who did not register are no longer required to provide a “status information letter” or documentation of their status from Selective Service. If asked for a status information letter, you may print a form letter concerning their request for a letter for use with USCIS.

USCIS Letter

Registering Without a Social Security Number

If you do not have a social security number, you can visit your local post office to pick up a form or download it here. Please mail your form to:

Selective Service System
P.O. Box 94739
Palatine, IL 60094-4739

Printable Registration Form

Updating Your Information

To correct or provide your social security number or update other personal information, please call us at  847-688-6888 for assistance.

You are required to notify us of an address change within 10 days of moving, up until January 1st of the year you turn 26 years old. Men are no longer required to notify Selective Service of address changes once they are 26 years old or older.

Update Your Address

Undocumented Immigrants

We do not now, or in the past, collect or share any information which would indicate a man’s immigration status, either documented or undocumented. Selective Service has no authority to collect such information, has no use for it, and it is irrelevant to the registration requirement. Consequently, there is no immigration data to share with anyone.

Dual Nationals

U.S. non-citizen and dual nationals are required by law to register with the Selective Service System.

NOTE: Registering with Selective Service is not signing up for the Armed Services. The Selective Service System is not part of the Department of Defense.

In the Event of a Draft

Most are liable for induction into the U.S. Armed Forces if there is a draft. They would also be eligible for any deferments, postponements, and exemptions available to all other registrants.

However, some non-citizens and dual nationals would be exempt from induction into the military if there is a draft, depending on their country of origin and other factors. Some of these exemptions include:

  • a non-citizen who has lived in the U.S. for less than one year
  • a dual national whose other country of nationality has an agreement with the U.S. which specifically provides for an exemption

Exemptions From Service

Some countries have agreements with the U.S. which exempt a non-citizen national who is a citizen of both that country and the U.S. from military service in the U.S. Armed Forces. A non-citizen who requests and is exempt under an agreement or bilateral treaty can never become a U.S. citizen, and may have trouble reentering the U.S. if he leaves.

A non-citizen who served at least a year in the military of a country with which the U.S. is involved in mutual defense activities will be exempt from military service if he is a national of a country that grants reciprocal privileges to citizens of the U.S.

During a draft, any claims for exemptions based on any of the above categories would be granted or denied by a man’s Local Board.