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State / Commonwealth and Territory Legislation

Maintaining a high compliance rate is of concern to officials because it means that any future draft instituted by Congress and the President in a national emergency would be fair and equitable. Also, men who fail to register with Selective Service are not eligible for certain programs and benefits that Congress and most states and territorial legislatures and the District of Columbia have linked to registration. They include student loans and grants for college, government jobs, and job training. Additionally, immigrant men residing in the U.S. who failed to register when they were at least 18 years old, but not yet 26 years old, may be denied U.S. citizenship by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

Many states and territories have passed legislation that supports the federal Selective Service registration requirement. The most current legislations linked to Selective Service registration are driver’s license legislation within the states, territories, and the District of Columbia. To date, 40 states, 4 territories, and the District of Columbia have enacted driver’s license laws that support registration. Scroll down to see the section on Driver’s License Legislation below.


Other Legislations –


In addition, there are other state laws which require a man be registered with Selective Service (or prove he is exempt from the registration requirement) before he can receive state student financial assistance and/or be eligible for state government jobs.

Currently, 31 states and 1 territory have enacted what is often called “Solomon-like” or “Thurmond-like” legislation linking a man’s eligibility for state-funded higher education benefits or state jobs to the federal Selective Service registration requirement.

Refer to the list by state, territories, and the District of Columbia with Solomon- and Thurmond-like legislations: Other Legislation


Driver’s License Legislation –


DriverBACKGROUND:  In an effort to ensure compliance with federal law among young men, many states and territories, and the District of Columbia, have enacted legislation which links Selective Service registration with the process of applying for a driver’s license, renewal, or state identification card. As a result of such legislation, in May 2002, the state of Delaware, which enacted driver’s license legislation in 2000, became the first state to reach nearly 100 percent registration compliance since Selective Service began compiling this data. In that same year, seven other states increased their compliance rates by 3 percent or more after enacting similar driver’s license legislation.


Description of Typical State Driver’s License Legislation –


These laws are simple and inexpensive to implement. They instruct the state’s Department of Public Safety or Motor Vehicles to include a consent statement on all applications or renewals for driver’s permits, licenses, and I.D. cards. The statement tells the applicant that by submitting the application he is consenting to his registration with the Selective Service System, if so required by Federal law.

NOTE: Females are not required to register with Selective Service under current law. Men age 26 and older are too old to register with Selective Service.

Transmission of applicants’ data to the Selective Service System is accomplished electronically through an existing arrangement each state has with the data sharing system of the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVAnet) at no extra cost to the state.


There are two forms of driver’s license legislation:


1. Optional, where a man, age 18 through age 25, can opt to have his information transferred to Selective Service for registration by checking a box when applying for a state learner’s permit, driver’s license or renewal, or I.D. card.

Thirteen states, two territories, and the District of Columbia have driver’s license legislation which provides for the option to get registered with the Selective Service System.

2. Automatic, where a man, age 18 through age 25, consents to have his information automatically transferred to Selective Service for registration when he applies for a state learner’s permit, driver’s license or renewal, or I.D. card.

Twenty-seven states and two territories have driver’s license legislation which automatically registers men with the Selective Service System.

NOTE: All driver’s license legislations only apply to men under age 26.


Status of State Driver’s License Legislation


As of July 1, 2015, 40 states, 4 territories, and the District of Columbia have enacted driver’s license laws supporting Selective Service registration. They are:

Enacted and Implemented – Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia;

Enacted But Not Yet Implemented – Maine, Maryland, and Puerto Rico.

Registration is the LAW. The effect of driver’s license legislations is twofold. They increase public awareness of the registration requirement and ensure recipients of public funds are in compliance with federal law.


Driver’s License Legislation by States, Territories, and the District of Columbia –


NOTE: Start date is defined as the date when Selective Service actually started receiving the data transmissions from the states or territories or District of Columbia, depending on the terms of the driver’s license legislation.

* Denotes those states, territories, and the District of Columbia with optional driver’s license legislation.


AL, AK, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, DE, DC, FL, GA, GU, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NY, NC, ND, NMI, OH, OK, OR, PA, PR, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VT, VA, VI, WA, WV, WI, WY

Alabama: On October 1, 2001, an Alabama law became effective in which a person age 18 through age 25, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, is automatically registered with the Selective Service System. Gov. Don Siegelman signed this legislation on May 17, 2001. The start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions was November 1, 2001.

Alaska: Alaska does not have driver’s license legislation in place supporting Selective Service registration.

Arizona:On April 24, 2003, Gov. Janet Napolitano signed into law a bill which states a person under the age of 26, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consents to automatic registration with the Selective Service System. This law became effective on January 1, 2004, which was also the start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions.

Arkansas: On February 20, 2001, Gov. Huckabee signed into law a bill which states a person age 18 through age 25, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consents to automatic registration with the Selective Service System. This law became effective on January 1, 2002, which was also the start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions.

California: There is no driver’s license legislation in place.

Colorado: On August 8, 2001, a Colorado law became effective in which a person age 18 through age 25, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, is automatically registered with the Selective Service System. Gov. Bill Owens signed the bill on May 30, 2001. The start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions was September 4, 2001.

Connecticut: A driver’s license legislation states a person age 18 through age 25, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consents to automatic registration with the Selective Service System. This bill passed state legislature and was signed by the governor. The start date was September 1, 2013, when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions from these applications.

Delaware: A driver’s license legislation states a person age 18 through age 25, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consents to automatic registration with the Selective Service System. This bill passed state legislature and was signed by the governor. The start date was September 1, 2013, when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions from these applications.

*District of Columbia: On April 27, 2001, Mayor Anthony Williams signed a law stipulating that men, age 18 through age 25, in the District can opt out from being registered with the Selective Service System when they apply to obtain or renew a District driver’s license. The effective date was October 1, 2002, and the start date when Selective Service began receiving data transmissions was October 30, 2002.

Florida: On September 1, 2001, a Florida law became effective which states a person age 18 through age 25, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consents to automatic registration with the Selective Service System. Gov. Jeb Bush signed this legislation on June 5, 2001. The start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions was October 1, 2001.

Georgia: On July 1, 2001, a Georgia law became effective in which a person under the age of 26, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, is automatically registered with the Selective Service System. Gov. Roy Barnes signed this legislation on April 18, 2001. July 1, 2001, was the start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions.

*Guam: On May 3, 2004, Gov. Felix P. Camacho signed a law stipulating that men age 18 through age 25 in Guam may opt to be registered with the Selective Service System when they apply to obtain or renew a state driver’s license. This law became effective on September 1, 2004. The start date was December 9, 2004, when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions.

Hawaii: A law became effective on January 1, 2002, in which a person age 18 through age 25, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, is automatically registered with the Selective Service System. This law was signed by Gov. Benjamin J. Cayetano on May 3, 2001. The start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions was January 1, 2002.

*Idaho:  On March 21, 2002, Gov. Kempthorne signed a law stipulating that men of Selective Service registration age in Idaho may opt to be registered with the Selective Service System when they apply to obtain or renew a state driver’s license. This law became effective on July 1, 2002, the same date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions.

Illinois:  A state legislation became effective on January 1, 2002, in which a person age 18 through age 25, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, is automatically registered with the Selective Service System. Gov. George Ryan signed this legislation on July 20, 2001. January 1, 2002, was the start date when electronic data was transmitted to Selective Service.

*Indiana:  On April 25, 2007, Governor Mitch Daniels signed into law a bill which states men of Selective Service registration age may opt to get registered with the Selective Service System when obtaining a state driver’s license or an I.D. card. The start date when Selective Service began receiving data transmissions was June 25, 2009.

*Iowa:  On April 21, 2003, Gov. Tom Vilsack signed into law a bill stipulating that men, age 18 through age 25, in Iowa may opt to get registered with Selective Service when they apply to obtain or renew a state driver’s license, permit, or state I.D. card. This law became effective on July 1, 2003, which was also the start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions.

Kansas:  On April 10, 2003, Gov. Kathleen Sebelius signed into law a bill in which a person age 18 through age 25, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, is automatically registered with the Selective Service System. This law became effective on July 1, 2003, which was also the start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions.

*Kentucky:  On March 12, 2003, Gov. Paul E. Patton signed into law a bill which states men, age 18 through age 25, in Kentucky may opt to get registered with the Selective Service System when they apply to obtain or renew a state driver’s license. This law became effective on July 1, 2003; the start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions from opted-in applications was November 17, 2003.

Louisiana:  On July 1, 2003, a Louisiana law became effective which states a person age 18 through age 25, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consents to automatic registration with the Selective Service System. Gov. Foster signed this legislation on June 18, 2003. The start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions was August 19, 2002.

*Maine:  The driver’s license legislation in which men can opt to have their information transmitted to the Selective Service System for registration was enacted (without governor’s signature) on May 18, 2011. Maine’s Department of Motor Vehicles began collecting and sending Selective Service’s Registration Form 1s in June 2011; there are no electronic data transmissions underway.

*Maryland:  On May 6, 2002, Gov. Parris N. Glendening signed a law requiring Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration to place the option on application forms for men under the age of 26 to be registered with the Selective Service System. However, the law never went into effect because there was a question of available funding. Thus, there is no start date when Selective Service would begin to receive electronic data transmissions.

Massachusetts:  There is no driver’s license legislation in place.

*Michigan:  On January 4, 2007, Governor Jennifer M. Granholm signed into law a bill which gives men under the age of 26 the option to consent to have their information forwarded to Selective Service for registration when obtaining a state driver’s license or renewal, or an I.D. card. The start date when Selective Service began receiving data transmissions for those applicants who opted-in for Selective Service registration was October 1, 2010.

Minnesota:  On May 13, 2004, Gov. Tim Pawlenty signed a law in which a person under the age of 26, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consents to be registered automatically with the Selective Service System. This law became effective May 16, 2005, which was also the start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions.

Mississippi:  A state legislation, which was signed on March 19, 2002, by Gov. Ronnie Musgrove, states men age 18 through age 25, who are required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who apply for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, are automatically registered with the Selective Service System. This law became effective on September 1, 2002; the start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions was January 1, 2003.

*Missouri:  On July 11, 2002, Gov. Bob Holden signed a law giving Missouri men under the age of 26 the option to be registered with Selective Service when they apply to obtain a state driver’s license or renewal, or instruction permit application. This law became effective on August 28, 2002, and the start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions for those who opted-in for Selective Service registration on their application was July 1, 2003.

*Montana:  On April 7, 2005, legislation was signed which gives men age 18 through age 25 the option to be registered with the Selective Service System. This law became effective October 1, 2005, which was also the start date when Selective Service began receiving Registration Form 1s for those who opted-in on their application to get registered with the Selective Service System.

Nebraska:  There is no driver’s license legislation in place.

*Nevada:  On May 22, 2009, Gov. Jim Gibbons signed a law stipulating that men age 18 through age 25 in Nevada may opt to get registered with the Selective Service System when they apply to obtain or renew a state driver’s license. This law became effective on July 1, 2010, which was also the start date when Selective Service began receiving data transmissions.

*New Hampshire:  On May 8, 2002, Gov. Shaheen signed a law stipulating that men under the age of 26 in New Hampshire may opt to consent to be registered with the Selective Service System when they apply to obtain or renew a state driver’s license. This law became effective on July 7, 2002; the start date when Selective Service began receiving data transmissions from those who opted-in for Selective Service registration on their application form was September 9, 2002.

New Jersey:  There is no driver’s license legislation in place.

New Mexico:  On April 8, 2003, Gov. Bill Richardson signed into law a bill which states men, age 18 through age 25, who are required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who apply for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consent to automatic registration with the Selective Service System. This law became effective on July 1, 2003. Selective Service had been receiving electronic data transmissions since July 1, 2001, when the legislation was initially worded such that men had the option to have their information forwarded to Selective Service for registration. When the legislation was revised for automatic registration, the data transmission process was already in place.

New York:  On September 17, 2002, Gov. George E. Pataki signed into law a bill which states men, age 18 through age 25, who are required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who apply for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consent to automatic registration with the Selective Service System. This law became effective on March 17, 2003, which was the start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions.

North Carolina:  A state legislation was signed into law on October 17, 2002, by Gov. Michael Easley, which states a person under the age of 26, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, is automatically registered with the Selective Service System. This law became effective on April 1, 2003. The start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions from these applications was November 3, 2003.

North Dakota:  There is no driver’s license legislation in place.

Northern Mariana Islands:  A law signed on November 30, 2001, by Gov. Tenorio, states a person under the age of 26, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consents to automatic registration with the Selective Service System. The start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions from these applications was November 1, 2001.

Ohio:  On November 2, 2001, Gov. Bob Taft signed a law which states a person age 18 through age 26, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consents to automatic registration with the Selective Service System. This law became effective on August 1, 2002, which was also the start date when Selective Service began receiving data transmissions from these applications.

Oklahoma:  On June 1, 2000, Gov. Frank Keating signed into law a bill which states a person age 18 through age 25, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, is automatically registered with the Selective Service System. This law became effective November 1, 2000, for collecting registration forms; the start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions from applications was on March 1, 2005.

Oregon:  There is no driver’s license legislation in place.

Pennsylvania:  There is no driver’s license legislation in place.

*Puerto Rico:  A driver’s license legislation was signed into law by the governor on December 12, 2011, which gives men, age 18 through age 25, the option to consent for their information be forwarded to Selective Service for registration. There is no data transmission at this time.

Rhode Island:  On June 27, 2002, a bill became law (without governor’s signature) which states a person under the age of 26, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consents to automatic registration with the Selective Service System. The start date when Selective Service began receiving data transmissions was January 1, 2003.

South Carolina: On June 5, 2002, Gov. Jim Hodges signed into law a bill which states that a person age 18 through age 25, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consents to automatic registration with the Selective Service System. The start date when Selective Service began receiving data transmissions was June 28, 2004. There are no Solomon- or Thurmond-like legislations in place.

South Dakota: Requires Selective Service registration before acceptance to all state schools and as a precondition to state employment. Signed by Gov. George S. Mickelson in 1988. On February 23, 2002, Gov. William J. Janklow signed into law a bill which states that a person age 18 through age 25, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consents to automatic registration with the Selective Service System. This law became effective July 1, 2002, which was also the start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions from these applications.

Tennessee: Requires Selective Service registration before acceptance to all state schools. Signed by Gov. Lamar Alexander in 1984. Registration is also required as a precondition for state employment. Gov. Ned McWherter signed this legislation in 1987. On May 29, 2002, Gov. Don Sundquist signed into law a bill which states that a person under the age of 26, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consents to automatic registration with the Selective Service System. This law became effective on December 1, 2002. The start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions from driver’s license applications was June 2, 2003.

Texas: Requires men to be in compliance with the federal Selective Service registration requirement to be eligible for state student financial assistance. The law was passed in 1997. Effective September 1, 1999, state employment is contingent upon Selective Service registration or exemption. On June 15, 2001, Gov. Rick Perry signed a law stipulating that men, age 18 through age 25, in Texas have the option to get registered with the Selective Service System when they apply to obtain or renew a state driver’s license. This law became effective on December 9, 2002, and Selective Service started receiving data transmissions on that same date. Later, an amendment to the existing driver’s license legislation was signed into law by the governor on May 28, 2011, which states that a person under the age of 26, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, is automatically registered with the Selective Service System. The effective date for automatic transmission was September 1, 2011, and Selective Service continued to receive electronic data transmissions from these applications as before.

Utah: Requires Selective Service registration as a precondition for state student financial aid. Signed by Gov. Michael O. Leavitt in March 1998. On March 15, 2001, Gov. Leavitt signed into law a bill which states that a person under the age of 26, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consents to automatic registration with the Selective Service System. The law became effective on May 14, 2001, which was the start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions. There is no Thurmond-like legislation in place.

Vermont: No legislation linking compliance with the Military Selective Service Act.

Virgin Islands: Legislation, signed on February 20, 2002, by Gov. Charles Turnbull, stipulates that young men in the Commonwealth, under the age of 26, who are required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law consent to be automatically registered with the Selective Service System when they apply to obtain a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or I.D. card. This law became effective July 1, 2002, which was also the start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions. There are no Solomon- or Thurmond-like legislations in place.

Virginia: Enacted three pieces of legislation. One requires Selective Service registration as a precondition for student financial aid. Signed by Gov. James Gilmore on April 14, 1998, and became effective July 1, 1998. Another requires registration as a precondition for state employment and was signed by Gov. Gilmore on April 5, 1999. A third bill was signed into law on March 6, 2002, by Gov. Mark Warner, which states that a person under the age of 26, who is required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who applies for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consents to be automatically registered with the Selective Service System. This law became effective on July 1, 2002. The start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions from these applications was August 7, 2002.

*Washington: The 39th state to enact a driver’s license legislation supporting Selective Service registration. The bill was signed by Gov. Christine Gregoire on May 16, 2011, which stipulates that men under the age of 26 in Washington may opt to get registered with the Selective Service System when they apply to obtain or renew a state driver’s license. It became effective January 1, 2012, which was also the start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions. There are no Solomon- or Thurmond-like legislations in place.

*West Virginia: Requires Selective Service registration as a precondition for state student financial aid and state employment. On April 8, 1999, Gov. Cecil H. Underwood signed the bill, which became effective on July 1, 1999. Then, on June 9, 2002, a West Virginia law became effective which gives men age 18 through age 25, who are required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who apply for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, the option to get registered with the Selective Service System. Gov. Bob Wise signed this legislation on April 3, 2002. The start date when Selective Service began receiving electronic data transmissions was March 24, 2003.

Wisconsin: Requires Selective Service registration as a precondition for state employment and state student financial aid. The bill was signed by Gov. Scott McCallum on August 30, 2001, and became effective January 1, 2002. On April 22, 2002, Gov. McCullum signed into law a bill which states that Wisconsin men, age 18 through age 25, who are required to be registered with Selective Service under federal law and who apply for a state driver’s license or renewal, permit, or state I.D. card, consent to be automatically registered with the Selective Service System. This law became effective on November 1, 2002. The start date when Selective Service began receiving data transmissions from these applications was August 1, 2003.

Wyoming: There is no legislation linking compliance with the Military Selective Service Act.