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Resources Portal

To reach those men who may be more likely to miss the message to register with the Selective Service System, we have put together this resource page in which you will find designated target groups we work with in our outreach efforts.These groups vary from leaders of ethnic and religious groups, financial aid registrars, juvenile correction officers, coaches and mentors, career and workforce counselors, along with other organizations who work closely with young men. We don’t want men to miss out on important opportunities because they did not know to register with the Selective Service System.

Here you will find useful sources of online and print content which can be used in your organization's information outlets, including websites, blogs, emails and print media. The materials are targeted at the various audiences in different ways. We have also provided a variety of formats to best suit your needs.

If you need materials customized in any way, e.g., different formats, different sizes, coordinating with your organization's branding, etc., please do not hesitate to contact Pat.Schuback@sss.gov.Also, let Pat Schuback know if you have some ideas to include here.
 

Registration Resources

Here you will find online and print content that can be used in your organization's information outlets, including websites, blogs, e-mails and print newsletters. The materials are targeted at different audiences in slightly different ways. We have also provided a variety of formats to best suit your needs. However, if you need materials customized in any way -- e.g., different formats, different sizes, adding your organization's branding, etc. -- please do not hesitate to contact Pat.Schuback@sss.gov.

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Protecting the Interests of Young Men in the Criminal Justice System

Men who have been in detention, jail, or prison, or otherwise involved in the criminal justice system, tend to be at higher risk for failing to register. The reasons for this are many, but center primarily around misunderstandings and misinformation about the law and how it applies to men in these circumstances. 

Working with professionals in the criminal justice, parole, and re-entry advocacy communities, we have tailored this toolkit to ensure that no man misses out on an opportunity to improve his life because he, or the people who support him, did not know why, when, or how to register with the Selective Service System.

We are always looking for materials that we can add to improve this resource page. If you have ideas for content that you would find useful, please contact Pat Schuback at 703.605.4105, or e-mail Pat.Schuback@sss.gov.

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Recreational Directors Toolkit

Coaches, counselors, and youth directors: if you work with young men, ask them if they are registered with Selective Service!

Virtually all men, including non-citizens, are required to register when they turn 18. If a young man doesn’t register by his 26th birthday, he loses eligibility for student loans and grants, federally funded job training programs, and many government jobs. In some states, he may be unable to renew his driver’s license. And for immigrants seeking to become citizens, failing to register will delay the naturalization process.

Anecdotal evidence suggests that most young men who don’t register didn’t know they had to–and didn’t know about the key benefits tied to registration.

“I recently decided to go to college. When I tried to apply for a Federal Pell Grant, I was told I didn’t qualify for one…the reason being that I never registered for Selective Service. What can I do now to get Pell Grant help for college?” – Young man who contacted Selective Service

Men who don’t plan to attend college right after high school, those who have been incarcerated, and immigrants and refugees are disproportionately among those who fail to register. By sharing information with them about why and how to register, you can help to ensure they have opportunities available to grow and succeed.

The easiest place to register is at sss.gov. If a man doesn’t have a social security number, he can also fill out a paper form at most U.S. Post Offices.

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Legislator and Community Leaders' Toolkit

Welcome to the Legislator and Community Leaders’ tool kit page.If you're here, you are likely familiar with how important Selective Service Registration is to the country, society, and the men who register. It’s crucial that men 18 through 25 years of age register with the Selective Service System.

We have found that the most important element in helping men to register is YOU. Word of mouth from family, friends, community leaders and elected officials can have a resounding impact. Your active support by communicating this information in meetings, newsletters, laws and proclamations to constituents, customers, family and friends is essential.

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Board Member Outreach Toolkit

Over 11,000 board member volunteers across the country are the backbone of the Selective Service System, and the agency could not fulfill its mission without you and your dedication and service as a board member.

We want to stress that from an agency perspective, the fact that you have agreed to serve in this critical capacity is more than enough. However, we have heard from many board members that serving gives them an opportunity to educate their communities about the requirement to register with Selective Service and the importance of registration in the lives of young men.

Familiar with your unique communities and the people who live in them, you bring an abundance of experiences to the table. Board members are well-situated to reach out through various channels to help Selective Service achieve two parts of its critical mission:

  • Recruit the next generation of Selective Service board members to ensure continuity of mission and excellence of service.
  • Make sure that important information about Selective Service registration is shared far and wide with young men and their influencers.

We have established this online toolkit as an optional opportunity for anyone who wishes to help recruit new board members, or reach out to organizations that serve young men. In addition, we are always looking for materials that we can add to improve this site. If you have ideas for content that you would find useful, please contact Pat Schuback at 703.605.4105, or e-mail Pat.Schuback@sss.gov

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Immigration Attorneys Toolkit

One issue that often doesn’t come up until it’s too late with immigrant clients? Checking to see if they’re registered with the U.S. Selective Service System.

To put it simply: registering is quick, it’s easy, and it’s the law.

Virtually all men, including non-citizens, are required to register when they turn 18, including undocumented immigrants, legal permanent residents, those seeking asylum, and refugees. Selective Service does not collect or share any information which would indicate a man's immigration status.

Non-citizens who are not required to register include men who are in the U.S. on a valid student or visitor visa, and men who are part of a diplomatic or trade mission and their families.

If a young man doesn’t register, he loses eligibility for student loans and grants, federally funded job training programs, and many government jobs.  In some states, he may also be unable to renew his driver’s license.

Men can still register up until their 26th birthday. Once they turn 26, however, they can no longer register, and become permanently barred from the opportunities associated with registering. For immigrants, failing to register can also complicate and slow down the process of becoming a citizen. Under current USCIS policy, immigrants who have not registered are not usually eligible for naturalization until they turn 31 – in essence, a five-year penalty.

The easiest place to register is at sss.gov. If he doesn’t have a Social Security number, he can also fill out a paper form at most U.S. Post Offices.

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